Music Lessons

Music Lessons - Music Recital - New York City - Performance - Piano Recital

What are the benefits of playing in a recital?

 

What are the benefits of playing in a recital?

When students perform in a recital in front of friends, teachers, and family, they provide great entertainment value to the audience. However, recitals benefit the participants too. Here are some of the benefits of playing in a recital:

  • Having something to work for

NYC Piano Teacher Alex C. post performance with two of his students

Something will change in you when you hear that you will be performing in a recital. Apart from the sense of urgency and nervousness, there is a deadline. If you don’t know the value of a deadline, ask working people who have to deal with one almost daily. When you have a recital to look forward to, you start practicing more often. Wether you are taking online lessons or in home music lessons, your sense of urgency to get the song right is a great motivator! You are willing to absorb information more than ever before. Once the recitals become routine, you are likely to keep working just as hard after the recital because you’ve enjoyed the rewards of your efforts.

  • Gaining performance experience

When you perform in a recital at a young age, you gain valuable performance experience. If it is your dream to be a professional musician, you will certainly need to get lots of live shows under your belt. It takes a few things to get used to performing in a live setting. It’s not easy to perform in front of people. You need lots of practice. When you are new to recitals, performance anxiety will be the order of the day. However, the more you perform in front of an audience, the easier it becomes. You learn how to play through a mistake or take a gracious bow or smile at the audience. That way, you are gaining very valuable experience to use for future performances.

  • Getting inspired by advanced performers

In many recitals, more beginner students are placed closer to the beginning with the more experienced coming at the end. That way, you get to watch the more advanced students do their thing. As a beginner, you see a great performance and discover that you are capable of playing like that too. All you need is some more time, practice, and energy. You will definitely leave the stage psyched to do exactly what you saw the seniors do. With time, your motivation will increase even as your performance skills improve.

  • Celebrating after an MTYH Recital

    Gaining a great sense of pride

This is perhaps the most important benefit you will get out of recitals! You have definitely worked very hard taking lessons in your home and faced the worst of your fears. How would you feel when the applause and smiles finally come from the audience? You will wish this magical moment of the recital lasts forever. Like most students, you will feel special, accomplished, and appreciated for all your hard work. It’s a moment like this that makes it worth the effort. This is when you are likely to psyche yourself up for the next challenge. When you enjoy this at a young age, you become more fearless. Your self-esteem will be boosted like never before. You will definitely look back when you are older and more successful with a smile that you were able to accept this awesome challenge.

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Music Lessons - Online Music Lessons

The Benefits of Online Music Lessons

Online music lessons are becoming a good alternative to face-to-face tutorials. Sure, you can find some tutorials on YouTube. However, such tutorials might not be tailored to meet your specific needs. With online lessons, you get a personalized solution to all your music learning needs. You’ll get a one-on-one lesson with an expert teacher through various mediums. This could be through a video call on Google Hangout, Skype, and Apple Face Time. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world. You can access online music lessons for as long as you have the interest to learn. Whether you are a seasoned professional or beginner, there is something about these lessons that will suit your needs.

Here are the benefits of taking live music lessons online:

  • Convenience

You can take online music lessons without leaving your home. All you need is a computer with internet connection and your instrument. You will arrange with your instructor when you should log into your FaceTime or Skype account to start your lesson. When you take your lessons from home, there is no need for commuting to and from the class. The scheduling is all about you and what works best for you! It’s even better if you are a parent so you can plan your music lessons around your children’s activities.

  • Freedom to select a teacher

With online lessons, you can get the teacher specializing in the exact thing you want to learn. This is because of the variety of instructors offering live online music lessons. Once you get one, your teacher will make a lesson plan. This will be specifically targeted at your goals and level of expertise. Who knows, you might even get help or advice outside lesson hours through email or instant message!

  • Extensive resources

When you have an online music teacher, you will be guided on the proper software and tools. With these, you are free to continue learning even when you are online. There are many websites where you can get the information you need. Your instructor will be able to guide you on where the best information is. Your instructor should be able to quickly address lesson problems or mistakes by directing you to online messages. When you do it online, you have the freedom to choose the materials that match your interests. You can, therefore, learn more and at your own pace. Online music lessons are available around the clock. Your online music teacher should help you know exactly how to get the maximum benefit out of them.

  • Cost-effectiveness

Learning music online is a sure way of saving you lots of money. Online music teachers charge less than they do for one-on-one lessons. You save the money you would have used commuting to and from music classes. After all, you are learning music from the comfort of your home. Also, you don’t have to buy expensive learning materials or get supplementary equipment from the music school. Computers have microphones and built in webcams so you won’t pay extra buying more equipment.

What are you waiting for? Get set up today at www.musictoyourhome.com!

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Inspiration - Music Lessons - Musical Thoughts - Viola Lessons

8 Reasons to Choose the Viola

Carrie D.

MTYH Viola teacher Carrie D. has been playing viola since age 6, and she’s pretty passionate when it comes to all things having to do with this cool instrument.  Here are her thoughts on why viola is a great choice for your musical journey:

Want to play the violin but can’t sing that high? Want to play the cello but don’t feel like lugging it around? Here’s a solution for you: viola!

A violin and viola look pretty much the same, so what exactly is the difference? Kindly referred to as a “larger violin” or “smaller cello,” the viola is the perfect choice for many reasons.

 

  1. It’s unique. Not many people start out playing the viola, and so you and your instrument would be one of a kind!
  2. Because the viola is “in between” a violin and cello, it comes in many sizes and lengths for all types of people, tall or short.
  3. Violists get to play violin music, cello music, and our own music. Because of this, you will learn how to read many different clefs, giving you the upper hand in future music theory classes.
  4. Being able to perform a wide variety of instruments’ music also means violists are adept at playing many different genres of music. Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th Century, rock and roll, Broadway, and much more!
  5. Composers today love to write for the viola, and the “new music” scene is an ever-growing part of the current musical community. Some of these pieces may even include electric viola.
  6. Beautiful things are associated with the word “viola:” Viola (the flower), Viola Davis (the actress), Viola Thompson (the baseball player), and even a character named Viola from Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night.
  7. While lots of musicians are focusing on playing the melody out front, violists get to play the harmony. They are good at supporting and helping other instruments, proving us to be true team players! This also makes the viola a great instrument for people who are shy and like to blend in.
  8. Music to your Home (MTYH) has viola teachers available and excited to start teaching YOU today!

 

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Old & Young Learning The Guitar
Music Lessons

Is There An Age Limit To Learning A Musical Instrument?

Music has an indescribable power. It can evoke emotions within a moment, stir a memory with the strike of one chord and bring countless hours of enjoyment, love, laughter and tears.

That is why many people have a desire to learn a musical instrument, yet hold back because of one simple reason; age!

It is not just the upper age limit that can present presumed problems, many parents are keen for their children to start along their musical path, but wonder whether they are too young to get started.

As an experienced music teacher I am keen to share my knowledge and expertise with you as we focus on our burning question; is there an upper or a lower age limit to learning a musical instrument? Let’s take those age limits one at a time.

Is There A Lower Age Limit To Learning A Musical Instrument?

Absolutely not! Did you know that you can help your child to take its first steps along its musical journey while it is still in the womb? It is strongly believed that playing music to an unborn child can have a positive impact, in fact, classical music is thought to even improve the intellectual ability of a growing baby, quite a thought!

Once your little bundle of fun has arrived, you will be keen to help that musical journey continue. Evidence suggests that until your child reaches nine years of age, there is a promising window for introducing a musical instrument. Many teachers will not take students until they are at least five years of age. However, this does not mean that your child cannot start to learn before that.

The best way you can help your child to start learning music before he or she reaches an age when they can attend professional music lessons is to expose them to as much music as possible. The aim at this age, is not to introduce them to instruments so that they will master them, but rather to help them develop a relationship and love of music. Even a toddler can fall in love with music!

While a traditional music teacher for a specific instrument may not take students that are very young, you may be able to find a general music class for babies and toddlers. The aim will normally be to help your youngster focus on the music being played, perhaps by swaying to the music, dancing with your baby in your arms or singing or playing music.

As the child grows, perhaps by the age of three, they may be able to attend more formal music lessons, again with a focus on music, rather than a specific instrument.

Once your child is five, they will now have developed a sub-conscious understanding of music, as well as a relationship with it. At this point, you will be in the perfect position to decide which specific instrument your child would enjoy learning. Giving music to your child is certainly one of the finest gifts you could bestow as a parent.

Is There An Upper Age Limit To Learning A Musical Instrument?

So we understand that there isn’t a lower age limit to learning music, but what about the upper age limit? I am going to give you the same clear answer as before; absolutely not!

Music is a gift, and anyone who is blessed with the ability to be alive should feel more than welcome to make use of it. That being said, you should be aware of a couple of crucial things you are going to need if you want to start your musical journey later in life.

Patience is a virtue! For youngsters, having youth on their side tends to speed up the learning process. Also, many have a natural musical talent which can be tapped into very well at a young age. Unfortunately, as the years creep up on us, so does the need for extra patience when embarking on a new venture. So long as you are willing to enjoy each step of the journey, you are going to do just fine!

Learning a musical instrument at an older age also requires a commitment to practice. When youngsters learn an instrument, they tend to be already in a learning system. Many are students at school or kindergarten and may also attend other extracurricular lessons. This means their brain is naturally in learning mode. For older music students, it is time to engage the learning part of your brain and give it enough opportunities to practice that progress will become satisfying.

Indeed being able to play a musical instrument is one of the life’s most enchanting pleasures. Remember, age is only a number, and should never be a roadblock in your quest to become a musician, why you can even use it to your advantage!

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Music Lessons

Looking for music lessons? Here’s what to ask me.

As one of the owners of Music to Your Home, I answer calls all day from potential clients looking for music lessons in NYC. I have a checklist of information I take from a new student that helps me match them up with the perfect teacher. But most people who call me aren’t really sure what to ask, so here are a few questions to ask to make your phone call with me effective and informative.

music_to_your_home_1174

Tracy & Vincent Reina

How many years has your company been in business?
Music to Your Home was started in 2003 by high school music teacher and private piano instructor Vincent Reina. Read more about Vincent and the Music To Your Home story here.

 

How do you hire your teachers?
Vincent and I go through stacks of resumes and hand pick each teacher. They all have a degree in music and many have continued their educations to receive Masters and Doctorate degrees. We personally interview each one of them based on our extremely high standards.

 

 

How long are the lessons?

Lessons are usually 30 minutes, 45 minutes or 60 minutes. If there’s more than one child, we can tweak the length to make sure each child is getting sufficient time.

How do I pay?
You can mail a check to us or pay via credit card. We don’t ask for payment until after the first lesson.

What’s your registration fee?
Zero. Zilch. Nothing. No up-front fees. Ever.

Do I need to have my own instrument? Can you help me find one?
You definitely need to have your own instrument for the lessons. Our teachers simply can’t lug a keyboard or guitar amp all over the city. We can certainly advise you on the perfect instrument to buy for the young beginner, or for our already accomplished musicians we are educational partners with Steinway and have great incentives for our clients.

What about music? Do you provide?
Our teachers will decide what method books and materials are needed and we can have them shipped right to your door.

How are lessons scheduled?
We are here to accommodate you! Let us know what days and times work best and one of our teachers will contact you to schedule. We also provide weekend lessons.

What if I have to cancel?
We ask for 24 hours advance notice of a cancellation. If you give the teacher enough notice, you won’t be charged for a missed lesson. We do make exceptions if a student gets sick on the day of the lesson. We’d consider that an emergency and would not charge you.

I’m moving, can I continue my lessons?
Let us know where – we have teachers all over! If there’s not a teacher in your area, most of our instructors can do on-line lessons so you can continue studying with our NYC teachers!

Do you have a recital?
Yes! Our recital takes place at the end of the school year and all of our students are welcome to participate.

How are the lessons structured?
We don’t subscribe to one lesson plan. Our students are all unique and have different learning styles, so our instructors teach to the particular student. They will all learn how to read music at their own pace.

What if we want to try a new teacher?
Our teachers are the best in NYC and we’re happy to send a different teacher if you wanted to try out someone else.

Now that you have an idea of some questions to ask,  give me a call to set up a private music lesson right in your home! 646-606-2515

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Guitar Lessons - Inspiration - Music Lessons - Musical Thoughts

When the guitar teacher becomes the student, and other insights from one of our Rock Gods.

Music to Your Home is lucky to be able to work with musicians from around the world, and Alejandro M. comes to us with words of wisdom from Argentina.  Currently he’s a professional guitar player and teacher living the dream and gigging all over NYC.

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Alejando M.

 

1) What advice would you give to parents who are considering getting guitar lessons for their children?
Alejandro: I’d very much encourage them to do so! Music is a form of expression and a language that allows children to pour out feelings they might be too shy to share otherwise. Once they learn how to play, music is something that will accompany and grow up with and in them throughout the years.
 
2) Why do you think guitar lessons are so popular?
Alejandro:  Perhaps because guitar is a bit more accessible than other instruments. In the sense that with a few weeks practice you might be playing a first round of songs already. As opposed to violin or saxophone for example, that, while amazing instruments, they can be somehow more challenging. We can’t avoid mentioning that the guitar is the instrument most showcased in billboards, commercial adds, etc. being widely associated with pop/rock icons. That weighs in too on some level.
 
3) What is the right age for a child to start taking guitar  lessons?
Alejandro:  I’d say after 10 years old. 
4) How much daily practice time does it take to become a good guitar player?
Alejandro:  There are no magic formulas. All the guys that play guitar really well, or any other instrument for that matter, it’s because they spent time with it. In that sense, I always tell students that it’s much better to practice maybe 10, 15 minutes every day, or every other day, rather than sitting down one day before the lesson and go for hours. Of course, the more time, the better. It’s a skill and needs to be developed regularly.
 
5) Do you incorporate finger exercises and note reading into your lessons?
Alejandro:  Definitely. Technique exercises are fundamental to begin gaining control over the fingers and have them do what you want, not the other way around. Note reading is also a very important aspect of my lessons but unless we’re aiming for classical pieces, I like to introduce the music notation system once we’re already playing some songs. Starting with a lot of theory from scratch in guitar for popular tunes can sometimes turn a bit overwhelming and non musical, in the practical sense.
 
6) What is the most popular style of music your students ask to learn?
Alejandro:  Generally Rock/Pop.
 
7) What do you love about teaching guitar lessons?
Alejandro:  What I love the most is to watch how the student make progress – that can be very satisfying. And I also love the fact that I’m learning too. When you see someone taking their first steps with the guitar, in a way, I rediscover things and look at them from another perspective. When you don’t know, you associate things differently and arrive to different places, right or wrong. Places that perhaps after playing for 17 years I wouldn’t have thought of. 
8) What was your most memorable teaching experience?
Alejandro:  Seeing former students that now have grown up, formed their own bands, performing live, writing their own songs, making their own records and their own musical statements. That’s the full circle, right there.
9) When and where was your most memorable performance?
Alejandro:  The last concert I did in Buenos Aires, in a theater, before moving to NYC. And the first here in New York as well, both very emotional milestones in my career.
 
10) Who are the guitarists that have inspired you?
Alejandro:  Many. But if I had to pick two, I’d go with Wes Montgomery & BB King.
11)What is your favorite type of music to play and what is your favorite guitar.
Alejandro:  Definitely Blues. My favorite guitar is the Fender Telecaster 72′ Custom Series. Or most of the hollow body ones.
12) What do you love about NY and being a musican in NY?
Alejandro:  From the city itself I love the diversity, the melting pot aspect of it. And as a musician I believe that being among such talented people, in every field, you inevitably become better. My songwriting grew a lot in the 4 years I’ve been living here. As an artist you’re a sponge that absorbs everything in your surroundings, and this is a very rich environment to be in.
Alejandro is available for guitar lessons in NYC.  Call us to schedule yours!
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Music Lessons - Musical Thoughts - Saxophone lessons

The Saxophone: Not just a Shiny Noisemaker!

Jim

Jim P.

Recently, Music to Your Home interviewed Jim P, one of our saxophone teachers and a current gigging musician all over NYC.  Jim indulged our curiosity about his experiences with teaching, playing, learning and inspiring his students. His philosophies on teaching sax lessons in NYC are not to be missed, so read on:

1) What advice would you give to parents who are considering getting saxophone or other woodwind lessons for their children?

Jim: I would say this about any instrument really, but take the plunge! How often does your child get one on one attention from a highly trained professional working in their field?

I also like the idea of mentorship when it comes to learning music. Having somebody to look up to, imitate, and question is really important. I know the student-mentor relationship has been and continues to be integral for me as I master my craft, and I want to share that experience with others, as well.

2) What is the best woodwind instrument to start young students on?

Jim: This is a really good question – For flute and clarinet players, students should start on their instrument of choice, but for saxophone players, there is some discussion. I know my teachers started me on clarinet before switching to saxophone, because the clarinet requires more technique and control. I also understand the argument for starting students on sax right away – if that’s the instrument they want to play and it’s going to keep them interested and involved in music, then maybe it’s right to skip the clarinet and go right to sax. I think it’s okay to start a young student on saxophone, especially if they’re getting a dedicated lesson time once a week.

3) What are some obstacles that saxophone or clarinet students face when learning how to play and how can they be overcome?

Jim: I think a lot of it is just patience – with yourself and with the instrument. When you pick up a woodwind for the first time it can feel very awkward. You’re shoving a hunk of metal and wood and rubber into your face and it has all these buttons and levers and you can’t see what you’re doing with it.

Our modern culture in a lot of ways is centered on ease of use – if we can’t operate a new phone or app within two minutes we give up. Saxophone, and other woodwinds, they’re different. They take patience and perseverance. You have to pace yourself, and give yourself time to grow and learn.

4) How much daily practice time does a beginner need to realize steady progress and become a proficient player?

Jim: The short answer? About 15 minutes. With beginning students, getting acclimated and adjusted to the instrument is essential, and usually about 15 minutes of daily, uninterrupted, focused practice will help with that acclimation and learning the fundamentals of playing. There is also a lot going on with the muscles of your face and hands as you start a new instrument, and you don’t want to over extend yourself.

Depending on the student and their goals on the instrument, 15 minutes can expand into longer periods in the first weeks or months. Personally, I think about my own practice from a more goal-orientated perspective, but for a lot of students, timing their practice is very helpful.

5) What benefits outside of music can come from learning the saxophone?

Jim: Well I was talking about the patience aspect earlier, and I really think that’s huge. When I pick up a horn it can be very meditative for me. Working slowly on difficult passages, while it stresses some people out, really helps me to slow down and think about my problems methodically.

Beyond that, I mean you could go through a ton of benefits that studies attribute to studying music. Improved test scores and all of that. Problem solving skills, motor skills, spatial skills, learning a new language, they all come into play when you’re learning music, and in real time. To me, when people talk about that stuff, what they’re getting at is that studying music (or really any other art) helps you to become a more complete person.

6) What do you love about teaching and being a performer in NYC?

Jim: My favorite part about teaching and playing in New York is the people that I meet and work with, without a doubt. The people I know on Music To Your Home’s teacher list are great examples – Lena H. (woodwinds), Manuel S. (piano), Daan K. (guitar), Tim T. (drums), Owen B. (woodwinds). These men and women aren’t just formidable musicians, but amazing and inspiring people to be around. Honestly, they are the reason I work so hard to be the best musician and person I can be.

7) What was your most memorable teaching experience?

Jim: I was working with a student when I lived in the Midwest. He and I basically started together while he was in middle school, and we had a really good rapport all the way through high school. When I moved to New York we stopped working together, but we kept in touch. When he did his first solo recital as a high school senior he wrote a very heartfelt thank you to me in the program – knowing that I couldn’t be at the performance and that I would probably never read it myself. An old professor of mine actually sent me a picture – I’m not actually sure that the student ever knew I read his thank you. I think about that to this day, and how much of an impact a teacher can have on his or her students, and vice versa, and how cool that can be.

8) When and where was your most memorable performance?

Jim: This is a really difficult question – the “big” performances either featuring my music or at important venues or with important people, they’re memorable in their own way, but the performances I really cherish are the times that the music was really happening.   I remember one time specifically, we were playing with this jazz-funk band at this dive – and for whatever reason, the whole band just clicked. We opened up to all these new territories and opportunities; it was like everything was brand new. It was really a beautiful moment. And even though we were on this little stage with only a handful of people in the audience, everyone was laughing and smiling by the end. Those are the moments I really live for as a performer.

9) Who are you musical influences?

Jim: I probably have too many to list. For jazz; Charlie Parker, Cannonball Adderley, Wayne Shorter, John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, Warne Marsh, Herbie Hancock, Bill Evans, and Mark Turner are just a few of my favorites on a long and ever-growing list.

For more rock or funk influenced music (because I end up playing a lot of it) I look to Maceo Parker, Lennie Pickett, John Scofield, and Kenny Garrett for inspiration.

saxophone10) Do you have a preferred woodwind method book for beginner students?

Jim: The Standard of Excellence series by Bruce Pearson or the Rubank books are my favorite methods for people just starting out. There are some great jazz methods by Lennie Niehaus and Jim Sniedero I really like once the student has some faculty on the instrument.

I also use a lot of my own material in my teaching – not only do I work on pedagogical material for all my students’ benefit, but I like writing stuff for individuals as well. I think about teaching – especially one on one lessons – as a two way street. There are a lot of ways to solve a problem; why not cultivate an individual’s problem-solving capabilities instead of just telling them what’s “right” and what’s “wrong?” In this way, we’re learning how to be human beings and artists instead of just pushing buttons on a shiny noisemaker. Plus it’s just way more fun.

 

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Music Lessons - Voice Lessons

Want to learn how to sing? Here’s what you need to know from our expert!

Kiyan

Kiyan T.

Music to Your Home is proud to work with the best, brightest and coolest musicians in NYC so we’ve been picking their brains about music lessons.  The latest interview was with Kiyan T., who took the time out of his busy schedule consisting of teaching, recording and performing to answer these 10 important questions every parent considering singing lessons for their child should know.

 

1) What advice would you give to parents who are considering getting vocal lessons for their children?

Kiyan: Make sure to speak with the child beforehand to see what they’re into as far as genre, or what they see for themselves musically, in conjunction with your own opinion. This way, you can know what you’re looking for in a teacher.

 

2) Why do you think vocal lessons have become so popular over the past few years?

Kiyan: Thats a large question! I think there’s a large correlation to singing and the high-glam pop star image that technology permeates into media. Its important to remember that singing is art, technical, and requires an instrument (the human body) to be understood and mastered, with plenty of love and passion!

 

3) What is the right age for a child to start singing lessons?

Kiyan: I would say no younger than 7. Maybe an unusually intuitive 6 year old?

 

4) How much daily practice time does it take to become a great singer?

Kiyan: I don’t think a “daily” regiment is the answer. You need to love singing, and feel that natural inclination to express through this medium, in order to have the desire to practice enough to become “great”, however many hours that takes.

 

5) Are vocal warmups important? If so what are you favorite to do?

Kiyan: Honestly, I talk so much that by the time I have to sing, the voice is already warm. I enjoy warm ups in minor keys that feel like musical lines. This gets the ear going, as well as a sense of carving out a phrase.

 

6) Do you think having a piano at a vocal lesson is important?

Kiyan: It makes it much easier, yes, but I have done Skype lessons without a piano for many years without a hitch.

 

7) What do you love about teaching voice lessons?

Kiyan: I love that, in my self-centric life as a recording artist, I get to take all of my musical faculties and apply them to another person. Its a rewarding balance of ego for me in the sense that while on my time, I will ask you to think of music the same way I do (visually, kinesthetically, emotionally), which leads to so much growth. I often find my approach just catches people off guard in how absolutely simple it is.

 

8) What was your most memorable teaching experience?

Kiyan: I was in college, and I had a student come to me completely unable to match pitch. I’m talking: I play middle C, and he sings the F# two octaves below. After two or three months, I said “listen, I don’t know if this is going to work. I’m starting to feel bad taking money from you when I can’t even get a single note out of you.” He wouldn’t have it, and insisted that we continue. It was only after research on overtones from the piano as opposed to the human voice did I realize that all I had to do was use my voice as reference. I had him doing a major scale, in solfege, up and down, and unaccompanied in two weeks. What a huge triumph this was!

 

9) When and where was your most memorable performance?

Kiyan: My first solo show in New York was a highlight for me.

 

10) Who are the singers that have inspired you?

Kiyan: Too many to list, but: Patti LaBelle, Beyoncé, and Edita Gruberova.

 

Kiyan T. is available in NYC for voice & piano lessons.  Contact us today to schedule yours!

 

 

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Music Lessons - Piano Lessons - Technology

Buying a Piano – What You Need to Know

childs-fingers-playing-the-piano-1817a
So you’re ready to get your child started with piano lessons.  Congratulations!  You’ve taken the first step in what is sure to be many joyous years of beautiful music.  We know the value of music lessons for children.  We’ve all read the studies proving that we are great parents for giving our kids the opportunity to study music.
So now that we’ve collectively patted ourselves on the back, it’s time to make that call and get a teacher in the door.  One of the first questions you’ll be asked by a teacher is an obvious one, “Do you have a piano or a keyboard?”
And herein likes a dilema.  You don’t have a piano, but that’s ok. Here are some suggestions to help you get going.
If space is an issue, we reccomend purchasing a keyboard with weighted, or hammer action keys.  That means that when you press down on the keys, it will offer the slight resistance of a real piano. If you’re worried about noise, you can always plug headphones in.
We’ve found the Williams Allegro keyboard to be a solid choice for students of all ages and levels.  They keys are weighted, it’s reasonably priced and even our teachers are buying it to use for practice at home.
There are keyboards with 61 or 88 keys.  61 is sufficient but 88 is the same size as a real piano, but again, if you’re concerned about space, go for the 61 keys.
Keyboards come with all sorts of bells and whistles, so find one that suits your needs.  Into electornic music?  Want to record yourself playing?  Need drum tracks?  There are different models that can accomodate your interests.
If you have a real piano, make sure it’s in tune and all the keys work.  A lot of our clients have inherited pianos and are worried about their age and sound.  A reliable technician  can make sure it’s in good working condition and make any adjustments it may need.
Thinking of purchasing a piano?   There are spinnets, uprights, baby grands, grands, studio grands, even concert grands!  As you can imagine, the prices vary, as do the sizes so if you’re overwhelmed we can help guide you in the right direction.
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In our experience, generally the young student starting out can study for many years on a keyboard with weighted keys, like the one we suggested above. Find a nice quiet spot, a comfortable bench or chair, then call us to get one of the finest piano teachers to show you how to use it!
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Music Lessons - Piano Lessons

 Top 3 Piano Exercise Methods That Will Boost Your Playing

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Have you ever listened to or watched a famous pianist like Lang Lang perform and wondered, how does he move his fingers so fast? Well, we often get that question from our own piano students. The answer is technique!  Great pianists acquire their technique from years of  practicing preparatory exercises and etudes. Here are a few of our favorite proven exercises for achieving  great virtuosity on the keyboard. 
Aloys Schmitt is best remembered for his Op. 16 exercises. The collection is divided into three sections. The first helps  students in gaining finger independence through a variety of single and double-note patterns within the range of a fifth. The second section works on passing the thumb under fingers to prepare for scales and arpeggios. The final section provides traditional scales and arpeggios in a notated format with fingering. The exercises in the book help build not only virtuosity, but also extreme steadiness of the fingers. These exercises isolate weak fingers like 4 and 5 in both hands and slowly build up strength over time to help with a balanced and steady sound. The later part of the book focuses on the very important major and minor scales that every pianist must be familiar with.
These exercises are intended to address common problems which slow down the performance abilities of a student.  Much like the Schmitt exercises, Hanon works on “crossing of the thumb”, strengthening of the fourth and fifth fingers, and quadruple- and triple-trills. The exercises are meant to be individually perfected and then played in sequence. Besides increasing technical abilities of the student, when played in groups at higher speeds, the exercises will also help to increase finger strength. These exercises are also divided into three parts: preparatory exercises, scales and arpeggios and virtuoso exercises for mastering great technical difficulties. A must for any budding pianist!
Here is something a little different from the first two. These exercises are more melodic and actually help prepare the student for the more difficult technical studies. The exercises work on maintaining proper technique, dynamics and tempo. They also focus on playing in a variety of different keys. We like to incorporate these exercises into our lessons because they are more fun to play and students have found them to be more satisfying and enjoyable to listen to.
Although all of these methods are proven effective, it is truly up to the student to practice them on a daily basis to achieve the best results. Adding these exercises into your weekly piano lessons as a warm up can also help enhance your current repertoire. Our NYC piano teachers will be happy to introduce these methods at your next lesson.
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Music To Your Home
Music To Your Home
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