Monthly Archives: Aug 2016

Music Lessons - Piano Lessons - Technology

Buying a Piano – What You Need to Know

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So you’re ready to get your child started with piano lessons.  Congratulations!  You’ve taken the first step in what is sure to be many joyous years of beautiful music.  We know the value of music lessons for children.  We’ve all read the studies proving that we are great parents for giving our kids the opportunity to study music.
So now that we’ve collectively patted ourselves on the back, it’s time to make that call and get a teacher in the door.  One of the first questions you’ll be asked by a teacher is an obvious one, “Do you have a piano or a keyboard?”
And herein likes a dilema.  You don’t have a piano, but that’s ok. Here are some suggestions to help you get going.
If space is an issue, we reccomend purchasing a keyboard with weighted, or hammer action keys.  That means that when you press down on the keys, it will offer the slight resistance of a real piano. If you’re worried about noise, you can always plug headphones in.
We’ve found the Williams Allegro keyboard to be a solid choice for students of all ages and levels.  They keys are weighted, it’s reasonably priced and even our teachers are buying it to use for practice at home.
There are keyboards with 61 or 88 keys.  61 is sufficient but 88 is the same size as a real piano, but again, if you’re concerned about space, go for the 61 keys.
Keyboards come with all sorts of bells and whistles, so find one that suits your needs.  Into electornic music?  Want to record yourself playing?  Need drum tracks?  There are different models that can accomodate your interests.
If you have a real piano, make sure it’s in tune and all the keys work.  A lot of our clients have inherited pianos and are worried about their age and sound.  A reliable technician  can make sure it’s in good working condition and make any adjustments it may need.
Thinking of purchasing a piano?   There are spinnets, uprights, baby grands, grands, studio grands, even concert grands!  As you can imagine, the prices vary, as do the sizes so if you’re overwhelmed we can help guide you in the right direction.
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In our experience, generally the young student starting out can study for many years on a keyboard with weighted keys, like the one we suggested above. Find a nice quiet spot, a comfortable bench or chair, then call us to get one of the finest piano teachers to show you how to use it!
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Guitar Lessons - Music Lessons - Musical Thoughts

Words of Guitar Wisdom from Andrew B.

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Music To Your Home recently asked one of our favorite guitar teachers,  Andrew B. some common questions we get from our new guitar students. Here’s what he said…
What/if any, are the most popular songs your young students are generally requesting to learn ?
Andrew: Taylor Swift songs are very popular for young students. “You Belong With Me” is a nice one for beginners as is “We are Never Getting Back Together“.  A lot of young guitar students are also surprisingly interested in classic rock. Two often requested songs are “Back in Black” by AC/DC and “Smoke on the Water” from Deep Purple.
What do you think are the most valuable songs for young students to learn and why?
Andrew:  When students are first learning how to read and identify notes on the staff and apply it to the guitar, it is important to learn songs that utilize only a couple of strings at a time. As each region is mastered, the student is able to learn melodies with a wider range.  Here are some examples of melodies that use this method:
Top 2 strings: ” Ode to Joy
Top 3 strings: “Happy Birthday”
Top 4 strings: ” Amazing Grace
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With chord strumming being such an integral part of guitar playing as well, a separate set of songs that utilize basic chord progressions is also important to learn along with melodies and note reading. This compartmentalizes practicing into two straight forward categories 1. Melodies (lead) and 2. Chords ( Rhythm)  Some good examples of beginner chord songs are:
3. “You Belong with Me”
What are the most important lessons or ideas a young/beginner guitar player should know when getting started?
Andrew: Be patient. Don’t expect to master songs in a day.  Consistency is important with practice. It’s better to practice 10 minutes every day than an hour or so before a lesson.  There is no time limit on learning. Everyone learns at different rates. Sticking with it will pay off!
Andrew is currently available for new guitar students in NYC.
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Music Lessons - Piano Lessons

 Top 3 Piano Exercise Methods That Will Boost Your Playing

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Have you ever listened to or watched a famous pianist like Lang Lang perform and wondered, how does he move his fingers so fast? Well, we often get that question from our own piano students. The answer is technique!  Great pianists acquire their technique from years of  practicing preparatory exercises and etudes. Here are a few of our favorite proven exercises for achieving  great virtuosity on the keyboard. 
Aloys Schmitt is best remembered for his Op. 16 exercises. The collection is divided into three sections. The first helps  students in gaining finger independence through a variety of single and double-note patterns within the range of a fifth. The second section works on passing the thumb under fingers to prepare for scales and arpeggios. The final section provides traditional scales and arpeggios in a notated format with fingering. The exercises in the book help build not only virtuosity, but also extreme steadiness of the fingers. These exercises isolate weak fingers like 4 and 5 in both hands and slowly build up strength over time to help with a balanced and steady sound. The later part of the book focuses on the very important major and minor scales that every pianist must be familiar with.
These exercises are intended to address common problems which slow down the performance abilities of a student.  Much like the Schmitt exercises, Hanon works on “crossing of the thumb”, strengthening of the fourth and fifth fingers, and quadruple- and triple-trills. The exercises are meant to be individually perfected and then played in sequence. Besides increasing technical abilities of the student, when played in groups at higher speeds, the exercises will also help to increase finger strength. These exercises are also divided into three parts: preparatory exercises, scales and arpeggios and virtuoso exercises for mastering great technical difficulties. A must for any budding pianist!
Here is something a little different from the first two. These exercises are more melodic and actually help prepare the student for the more difficult technical studies. The exercises work on maintaining proper technique, dynamics and tempo. They also focus on playing in a variety of different keys. We like to incorporate these exercises into our lessons because they are more fun to play and students have found them to be more satisfying and enjoyable to listen to.
Although all of these methods are proven effective, it is truly up to the student to practice them on a daily basis to achieve the best results. Adding these exercises into your weekly piano lessons as a warm up can also help enhance your current repertoire. Our NYC piano teachers will be happy to introduce these methods at your next lesson.
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Inspiration - Musical Thoughts - Piano Lessons

8 Questions About Piano Lessons Answered by One of Our Experts

13873140_1191854087501350_5915102465032288443_nOne of our favorite NYC piano teachers, Rita R. answered some often asked and important questions about piano lessons, her teaching philosohpy and favorite musical moments.
1) What advice would you give to parents who are considering getting piano lessons for their children?
Rita: Piano lessons are a great way to introduce children to music and deeper understandings of history, culture, and expression in a way that is fun and interactive. Their appreciation for music will stay with them for the rest of their lives and they will grow in every way!
2) Why do you think the piano is such a popular instrument for very young students?
Rita: The piano is a very visual and tactile instrument. Very young children can develop their fine motor skills as well as their ear. They can distinguish different sounds, high and low, patterns and string it all together to make music.
3) What are some obstacles that piano students face when learning how to play and how can they be overcome?
Rita: Many students struggle with not understanding right away, or having a harder time multitasking (thinking about finger patterns, hand shape, rhythm and notes all at the same time), but we work on those things all the time by taking each component and working on it separately, and going at the pace of the student. I tailor every lesson to the student’s interests so that they can progress and enjoy musicmaking.
4) How much daily  practice time does a beginner need to realize steady progress and become a proficient player?
Rita: Daily practice is very important, but the amount is less important than the point of practice. Every practice session should have a goal, even if it’s tackling only one tricky measure. If it takes 5 minutes or 30, it’s still an accomplishment. Practice goals are more important than setting a time.
5) What benefits can come from learning the piano?
Rita: Piano gives an understanding of music, history, and art. It helps students in multitasking, working in an intelligent and time-efficient way, and handling projects easily. Music helps in recognizing patterns, fine motor skills, work ethic, and most importantly gives students an outlet for expression.
6) What do you love about teaching piano and being a performer?
Rita: I tailor my lessons to my students, and the more I teach the more I learn about my own approach. I also really enjoy working with students of all ages – every student brings their own interests and personalities, and we end up learning from each other. It is also a privilege to pass on what I have learned from my own teachers and mentors. As a performer, I enjoy sharing my connection to the music with my audience, and it’s an amazing experience.
7) What was your most memorable teaching experience?
Rita: The moment when a student realizes that they can do what the music is asking is always memorable!
8) When and where was your most memorable performance?
Rita: My senior recital and my Masters recital were both big events because they signified a culmination of my own understanding of music and style, helped by my wonderful teachers. They were also jumping off points for my future performances.
To study with Rita, contact Music to Your Home today! 646-606-2515 or visit our piano lessons page
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Music Lessons - Voice Lessons

Want to learn how to sing? Here’s what you need to know from our expert!

Kiyan

Kiyan T.

Music to Your Home is proud to work with the best, brightest and coolest musicians in NYC so we’ve been picking their brains about music lessons.  The latest interview was with Kiyan T., who took the time out of his busy schedule consisting of teaching, recording and performing to answer these 10 important questions every parent considering singing lessons for their child should know.

 

1) What advice would you give to parents who are considering getting vocal lessons for their children?

Kiyan: Make sure to speak with the child beforehand to see what they’re into as far as genre, or what they see for themselves musically, in conjunction with your own opinion. This way, you can know what you’re looking for in a teacher.

 

2) Why do you think vocal lessons have become so popular over the past few years?

Kiyan: Thats a large question! I think there’s a large correlation to singing and the high-glam pop star image that technology permeates into media. Its important to remember that singing is art, technical, and requires an instrument (the human body) to be understood and mastered, with plenty of love and passion!

 

3) What is the right age for a child to start singing lessons?

Kiyan: I would say no younger than 7. Maybe an unusually intuitive 6 year old?

 

4) How much daily practice time does it take to become a great singer?

Kiyan: I don’t think a “daily” regiment is the answer. You need to love singing, and feel that natural inclination to express through this medium, in order to have the desire to practice enough to become “great”, however many hours that takes.

 

5) Are vocal warmups important? If so what are you favorite to do?

Kiyan: Honestly, I talk so much that by the time I have to sing, the voice is already warm. I enjoy warm ups in minor keys that feel like musical lines. This gets the ear going, as well as a sense of carving out a phrase.

 

6) Do you think having a piano at a vocal lesson is important?

Kiyan: It makes it much easier, yes, but I have done Skype lessons without a piano for many years without a hitch.

 

7) What do you love about teaching voice lessons?

Kiyan: I love that, in my self-centric life as a recording artist, I get to take all of my musical faculties and apply them to another person. Its a rewarding balance of ego for me in the sense that while on my time, I will ask you to think of music the same way I do (visually, kinesthetically, emotionally), which leads to so much growth. I often find my approach just catches people off guard in how absolutely simple it is.

 

8) What was your most memorable teaching experience?

Kiyan: I was in college, and I had a student come to me completely unable to match pitch. I’m talking: I play middle C, and he sings the F# two octaves below. After two or three months, I said “listen, I don’t know if this is going to work. I’m starting to feel bad taking money from you when I can’t even get a single note out of you.” He wouldn’t have it, and insisted that we continue. It was only after research on overtones from the piano as opposed to the human voice did I realize that all I had to do was use my voice as reference. I had him doing a major scale, in solfege, up and down, and unaccompanied in two weeks. What a huge triumph this was!

 

9) When and where was your most memorable performance?

Kiyan: My first solo show in New York was a highlight for me.

 

10) Who are the singers that have inspired you?

Kiyan: Too many to list, but: Patti LaBelle, Beyoncé, and Edita Gruberova.

 

Kiyan T. is available in NYC for voice & piano lessons.  Contact us today to schedule yours!

 

 

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Music To Your Home
Music To Your Home
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